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in that environment, it has been hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids. the rest of our government, which is essentially on life- support. that is hard to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department is that you need to get back -- get by on cunning and strategy. you do not have the resources the other branches of the government has. the hope that there will be balanced in the account period ahead, the new budget includes the state department as part of the national security as a whole. i would not hold my breath. i think it will be hard making the case robusta diplomacy. my hope is that it will be a bipartisan effort. it will be challenged not matter much. my primary -- it will be challenged no matter what. we need something that will allow our forces to do several things. first, we need a robust change of views on strategy and our overall approach is. the kind of thing that chris laid out on talking abou
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
exaggerated. that's what's talked about any ideas. we are creatures who grew up in the savanna or environments where we were always subject to threat. so we're looking at that thing is going to hurt us, but we are no longer in those environments. we are in a complex economy, that really relies on organizations to provide basic necessities. so we have to update our thinking in a longer-term, focus on stories that represent trends and not exaggerate noise and we have to get away from here. so fear. a role in the development of human societies in the early stages is encoded in our dna. but to evolve to the complex modern environment we live in, we have to update the most basic aspects. so that's what your question speaks to. >> is a fearful venture capitalists? >> you know, the opposite of that, i may say well, venture capitalists has to be inherently optimistic because why would you invest in some thing where there's uncertain returns and so forth. telling a story about the coming prosperity is the story easily characterized. this is an optimist the beard i really don't see it that way. from my
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the time y
. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks, as a new domain of war. and yet, we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. and so what we're trying to do in the zero day series is to take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platoon i can idea is that -- p mr. speaker atonic idea is everybody from my mom and dad and to people in the congress, everybody can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities, monday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> president obama went to the headquarters of the federal emergency management agency today to get an update on preparations for hurricane sandy. the national response coordination center in washington is where fema is managing the deployment of federal resources to states along the east coast, ahead of the storm. >> thank you. >> keep it up. thank you. >> great job. >> >> across the country are conc
it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. ashink, let's use this area an example that we can hold up around the rest of the country. >> rebuttal from con
way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. -- the reliance on foreign fuel. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. i think, let's use this area as an example that we can hold up around the rest
environment for businesses or hospitals to grow so that could be more jobs? maffei: there's no question tax reform would be very, very important and if you think we need to lower rates but get rid of a lot of loopholes, particularly corporate loopholes, the ones that ship jobs overseas. cease to exist. ann marie buerkle is voted to continue. she's voted to continue to big tax breaks for oil companies. that's very important. i do think there's changes that need to be made in the affordable care act. i'm opposed to the device attacks. i've worked with well challenged not to in first place. i do think we need to make those changes but we will never making changes if we're not willing to compromise. >> moderator: would repealing affordable care act affect jobs in any way, it positively? the you see it affecting it in a negative way? buerkle: absolutely. this country needs health care reform. transom but you are saying he will repeal it? buerkle: i will repeal it and put in something that will be bipartisan. this is something the democrats sat down shutdown stroke of the of the american people.
per day. bees live in highly organized societies that adapt rapidly to their environment, but they are under increasing threat from humans. this film director spent five years researching why bees were dying out. his film aims to wake people up to the problem. >> over the last six years, 30% of the population has died every year in europe, north america, and china. in parts of switzerland, the number is 70%. sometimes in america, it is between 50% and 70%, but on average, 30% every year. if it keeps going on like that, our valleys will soon look pretty sad. >> they're dying because of mites, bacteria, and parasites, a result of large-scale beekeeping. >> >> it is like wit -- >> it is like we are capitalists. we want to grow. total global domination. >> miller looks after 15,000 hives. he moves them between plantations of apple and -- allman and apple blossom, transporting them all across the u.s. -- plantations of almond and apple blossom. >> in reality, agriculture has to work in partnership with the bees, but when i approached agriculture department's in switzerland, th
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new completely re-imagined 2013 chevrolet malibu. sleek new styling... sophisticated dual cockpit design, and sport sculpted seats. available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu. ♪ refined comfort to get you in a malibu state of mind no matter what state you live in. ♪ >>> we're awaiting president obama in a swing state of ohio. meantime, in another swing state, that of virginia, bill clinton campaigning on behalf of the president. let's listen in at chesapeake, virginia, at indiana river high school. [ applause ] >> i don't know about you, but i'd rather you save the gasoline and export the oil if that's what we need to do. and that's why governor romney is having such a hard time breaking through in ohio. so what did he do? he ran -- he put -- he put a bogus ad on saying that for president had allowed jeep to move jobs to china. then he said the president had allowed chrysler, which owns jeep, to move jobs to ch
supplies are going down. they are going down because of the burdens and regulatory environments shutting down power plants. what we have to do is look at my energy plan. it is an all of the above approach. we have to ensure that we put more plants in action. more nuclear facilities so america continues to lead economically. if we put ourselves at an economic disadvantage because we are meeting emissions targets that are already doing better than most industrialized we hold let's make sure anybody else accountable in the world. start worrying about the american energy and american economy. the pipeline, that is thousands of jobs that can be created right now in america with a signature from president obama. that needs to happen. let's make sure we maximize our missions controls, we utilize natural gas, and we look at expanding our nuclear options here in this country. >> 30 seconds. >> renewals can take care of -- i do not claim renewable can take care of all our energies at this time. we need to take a big step forward. we find ourselves unable to when we have people beholden to oil and
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
. small businesses are taxed at 35%. that is not sustainable in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a work force but can move back and forth easily. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural industry, they can i get back and forth li
to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. c2 >> nrator: then, when he wasas ten, h mothesent him t to ve with his grandparents >> i think is natura assume thayour fbe absent, then fm a reship wi yr ster, and en be separat from him and ber sepad fr yr mo and go liv yougrandpar o at that point you don' ally knoat w it mushave bn profound unseng. >> h early l a cstant stream opeople lving, h beg left his moer, his ther, his grandpar cstany moving his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home.mo >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that his grandmother was an alcoholic, too. >> narrator: but barry had gotten lucky. hawaii's most
some major advancement that would be great for the environment. obviously, the youth vote is very critical. it is also very unusual that people care so much. [inaudible] so you are lucky and blessed to be listening to and to be part of this election. >> tim? >> though, i wanted people to step up a little bit. we talked about fiscally conservative people, and i would like to see some socially liberal liberals. we didn't get into the juggler or civil liberties were a bunch of other things. and i would like to see something from the left. as far as i can see, we have gone butkus on all those issues. every couple of years, there is a big debate that are held in some false. a connection between libertarians and conservatives, is coming to an end? my friend, jonah goldberg, says it has a pretty good idea -- libertarians are useful because they ask the question should the government be doing the thing we are talking about. there are some things that libertarians can learn from conservatives. one of the roots of conservatism -- after eight years of bush in four years of obama, i'm not sur
in a highly politicized environment, as the white house and the state department has collected informations, they have gotten it to the american public as soon as they could. host: angie in jacksonville, fla., good morning. go ahead. last check? moving on to barbara. are you with us? go ahead. you are on the air. caller: 1 americans wake up on november 7th, they need to make the right choice to reelect president obama as the president of this great country. they have the corporations' buying and running their country. they will regret their choices forever. every day that this president has done until now and everything he will do after he has inherited this, bankruptcy of the whole country from his own party. these guys have shipped off the jobs to foreign countries. i lived through that. i have been a refugee all my life. host: sue dvorsky, any response to that caller? guest: there are a few important points that you bring up. i do believe that voters in florida, iowa, and voters across the country understand the depth of what this president and his team faced when they came in. today is
people think is the changing media environment. you mentioned we have not had prosecutions of reporters are media organizations, but i am wondering if your thoughts, and the challenges posed by the changing media landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints t
they weren't going to act on. >> it is interesting the politics in a tough economic environment, the first thing that goes is the environment. it just is, fair or unfair. >> the house of representatives under democratic control was able to pass that cap in trade legislation. look no further than missouri or virginia where you had democratic senators who had big coal industries who were probably a little scared of actually going on legislation like that. >> we're going to take a break. when we come back, we're going to talk a little bit about cars. anyway, trivia time. we asked the last republican elected from new jersey. the answer, clifford p. case. he was first elected to the senate in 1954 and he served until new jersey republicans rejected him for a fifth term in the primary. the state hasn't elected a republican senator yesterday and chris christie was the first republican to get over 50% in over 20 years when he won. we'll be right back. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole gra
of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the ne
billion in tort costs and create almost 300,000 jobs simply by improving the legal environment. that makes sense to me, and we can go through all of those numbers, but i would rather put my thoughts to the issue, then, of small businesses. we'll never have a sustainable recovery if we don't get a recovery in small business. look, you can go to a big pharmaceutical company or a big oil company, and you can have a great big lawsuit, and they're going to survive while it's going to be difficult and expensive, but you go after a small company, and they don't survive. it is fundamentally important to us not only to see the -- what happens in a state as to what's going to happen to big companies, what is going to happen to big job growth, but to understand that small guys work in an interdependent way with large companies, but many, many jobs come from there, and we have to always keep in our mind what's happening with small companies. now, one of my new things, mayor, you got to get on to this deal in your talks, is every time we have a merger in acquisition in this country -- i've just been th
back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the people at jpmorgan chase. these are real jobs, real families being put back to work. >> fill free to offer your opinion. >> 18,000 additional individuals who have dropped out of the work force, people who have taken part-time jobs, we can argue back and forth about the numbers but those people go to the polls and i will make a decision based on their own personal experience. >> >> you cited the number of people w
to request information, to raise issues. it's really a very different kind of oversight environment that i think will serve the university very well. >> many of the pitfalls of the previous administration and board of trustees at the time were due to poor communications and accountability between the office the president and leaders of the board. how have the free recommendations and lessons learned improved that community cation, and what processes have been instilled to ensure both groups of leaders are fully aware of what each is doing? >> i think i addressed african -- i think i addressed much of that in my last response, but it has been a year of much more frequent meetings, much enhappensed interactions. the board is fully aware and very well briefed of any major issues that are taking place at the university, and i would also say that one of the objectives in my administration has been to create more interaction among my senior leadership team so that whenever any issues come before the university, that come around our table, we're discussing them in the broad group of about 18 memb
or the environment and not a single vote talks about transportation infrastructure. not a single one of those votes were dealing with education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the tenth district and i think are critical votes get my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. schneider: if you look at the record this congress which is the most ineffective congress we have had in our lifetime you voted on the ryan plan that takes medicare and turns it into a voucher program. he voted with congress over 200 times against our environment and over 28 times against obamacare. he has voted with them on issue after issue on every -- >> moderator: congressman's dold you voted against obamacare. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, we can agree there things are things that are very -- i think we want to call it by its name and frankly i don't want to offend somebody that might want to call it something else but the long and short of it is i think we have 21 new taxes on this.
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
. that could not be more out of touch. a big part of this district is the environment, and so much of our economy is based on our environment. there is a direct correlation, whether it is tour is a more realistic. >> presidential candidate michele bachmann came down here and floated that idea and i was all over her on a -- like a black eye on a pea. when you look at what has happened with planned parenthood, perhaps you should call kathleen sebelius, to whom the agency came out with saint planned parenthood is not doing mammograms. >> both of you have spent a lot of money. it is among the costliest congressional races in the country to support legislation that would limit the influence of outside groups, and is that necessary? >> that needs to be argued in front of the supreme court. the supreme court already made that decision. if you look at our record, we have an incredible amount, almost 95% from individual donors. i cannot help but that people want to donate. if outside groups, some have placed $5 million in attacks against me. so be it at my opponent's father created pack specifical
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. lou: time for your comments, clair tweeted, saying obama hiding behind sandy. we're not letting it g please continue to bring it to light, lou. >> millie said, i'm sure that brave men who died in benghazi would want people to fight for their truth through any disaster. >> i agree with you. lou: jerry, said that obama administration ignored our people under attack. three broadcast networks are party to this by not covering the complete story. your show, lou dobbs covered everything from day one. we tried
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. with the fidelity stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see wh criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on dividend-paying stocks. then you can customize the strategies and narrow down to exactly those stocks you want to follow. i'm mark allen of fidelity investments. the expert strategies feature is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. so, which supeast 4g lte service would yochoose, based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. >>> we can happen on tuesday in wisconsin. let me ask you, are you already to win? are you ready to win. >> i look forward to waking
136. s&p 500 finished ahead 15. nasdaq was up 43. the top republican on senate environment committee blasting the obama administration for missing the deadline for disclosing the regulatory plans and the economic impact. oklahoma republican james inhof says the second straight legal deadline the white house missed. it missed hit the week. friday we take a special look at the coal industry. what it's up against. what is on the line in this election. fair and balanced look friday. on the coal industry. brace yourself for the possibility of another healthcare fight at the u.s. supreme court. believe it or not. the justice department is agreeing with liberty university that last summer's decision did not address several related issues. it says it does not oppose the school's request for a rehearing. if the supreme court grants the university's rehearing request, the case will first have to be heard at the fourth circuit court. >>> we are approaching the final weekend and several of the battleground states are still in play, of course. that's why they are battlegrounds. we will talk to ex
of difficult to imagine a president with with that high of approval in this kind of environment the getting thrown out, getting rejected. host: thomas fitzgerald, who covers politics for "the philadelphia inquirer." thank you for being with us. but it back to your phone calls. mike from pennsylvania, democratic line. good morning. caller: the morning, steve and terry. with controversy about the voter id lot to suppress turnout, do you think that this will in any way suppress turnout? if so, will it be enough to affect the margins in any way? thanks. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that required pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id's. if you did not have one, they would provide you with one but you have to go through certain procedures to get one. more recently, in the last three weeks, a judge in our states simply set aside that particular provision of law so that when pennsylvanian is go to vote on november 6th, you will be asked to show one of those six forms of identification. if you do not have one, you will still be permitted to vote. your vo
an environment in washington, d.c., where we are working together. we are trying to create an environment of working together. it is a political year. of course she is going to endorse the senator that best represents her local view, which is connected. >> senator, your turn. >> she did not endorse me. she just said what the record was. politics should never trump jobs. the problem was not wanting to invest in this country. clean water and clean air, it is a $3 billion industry, and we can have both, but you need regulations, and 50 days before an election they announced three years ago they are going to kill the plant. >> he brought us the company from an action the epa took, and epa was told by the chamber of commerce that if you took that action if you voted not to suspend the rules, they would not have to prevent it. that is the problem. you see bureaucrats are dictating policy in montana. we can do just fine. >> the congressman has talked about 95% and other things that are patently false. they said they could deal with these rules. the problem they have is with ash and hayes. they c
that the rise of the rest of the world was not only creating a new geopolitical environment, but an economic one and it was possible that our political leaders have not gotten their arms around it, and i believe rob shapiro's paper today will provide a better handle on what has actually happened to the american economy so hopefully the next president can take policy actions to make things better than the last decade or so. please join me in welcoming rob shapiro, good friend, a thought leader and economist. [applause] >> thank you. thank you for coming out. thank you to my friends that are here, including senior officials under the secretary of state. i also want to acknowledge doug of the senior economic analyst at 9 advisory company -- at my advisory company who did the numbers crunching for this, which is a capacity of mine that has become very rusty. my interest in the issue of what is really happening to the incomes of americans really began in 1988. i was running economic policy in the michael dukakis campaign, and he was making the statement comparing the median income in 1988 and the med
these votes not a single one talked about women's healthcare or the environment, not a single one talked about the votes education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to the 10th district and i think are critical votes. >> if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective congress we've had in our life times. he voted twice on the ryan plan and voucher program. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times genls obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue. >> you raced an important one. congressman dole your votes on obama care you voted against it is why? >> the affordable care ak act, there are things positive. >> you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare? >> we need to call it by its name. we have 2 new taxes on this. the estimates on the new set of 10 years doubled so this is going to be troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. after two years it is doubling so i think this is troubling because small businesses are looking at how can i pay the penalty and tell people the
to the media environment over the course of the week, it's blackout coverage. so the president's been in that coverage. and to some extent, much driven by the storm but he's -- he's there, he's the president on screen. governor romney has been nowhere. he's just -- it's not his fault. he's just not part of this conversation. he doesn't have anything to say about it. he doesn't have a role to play. so if you're a challenger, running a presidential campaign, in the last week to essentially be blocked from the airwaves for five straight days it's a big problem. forget whether he had momentum or didn't. it's a huge problem for a challenger. the presidential looked presidential. the combination of that the fact he's gotten policy right, substance right, optics right, and has gotten boost that he's gotten from governor christie, which has been huge, i think, not game changer, but to whatever extent you could weigh this in out -- who knows what the effect is on tangible votes -- but in terms of what's happened over the week a good week for president obama, and a problematic week for governor
. >> they can expect a warm, friendly interactive environment. we have a transformation team ready to make you look fabulous and a loot of women shop for spanx based -- lot of women shop for spanx based on their outfit and body shape. we have so many different yarns and things our transportation experts can help a woman and customer navigate. >> reporter: she said the new store has something for everyone including men. >> their undershirts have been the same 100 years. we tapered it at the waistline, added lycra so it doesn't stretch out easy and it makes guys go a belt loop tighter. we want to go international and tysons corner is just the start. >> reporter: in virginia beth parker, fox 5 news. >>> coming up next the x-factor goes live, the judges talk about doing their first live show together and what's next for the remaining contestants. >> on the news edge at 11:00 a fight caught on camera at a local high school, why the mother of one of these girls claims this could have been prevented. anncr: which do you believe? what mitt romney's tv ads say about women? or what mitt romney himself
view anything dealing with the environment as potentially damaging jobs. and romney had to pass a litmus test during the primaries, which, was in effect 'climate change is a hoax. don't trust the scientists. >> another largely ignored fact of life in 2012, a series of mass shootings. 2 killed and 9 wounded outside the empire state building. 7 killed at a university in oakland, california. 7 dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wounded at a movie theatre in aurora, colorado. and then there was this -- >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> liberty and justice for all. >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theaters don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on gun
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